Frequently Asked Questions About Diving at Calypso Beach & Dive Resort

Scuba diving might seem complicated at first, but you will see how fast and easy it is to learn about all the inns and outs of using your scuba diving theory, equipment and courses! Find additional information for questions you might have about diving right here in our Frequently Asked Questions. If your questions stays unanswered don’t hesitate to send us a message and we will reply qucikly!

Our Dive Center | Dive Sites and Safaris | Learning to Dive | Continuing your diving Education | Professional Diving Courses | Dive Equipment

Our Dive Center

Q: Can I get accommodation at Calypso as well as diving?

A: Yes. Calypso is a diving resort with rooms, restaurant, bar and of course the dive center. We would be delighted to accommodate you during your diving vacation.

Q: What about entertainment after the dives?

A: There will be plenty to entertain you top-side on Boracay and at Calypso! The restaurant and pool-side bar is open every day from 7am until late, often with entertainment during early evening. We also host the popular shuffleboard tournaments twice a week with great prizes. The dive center itself organizes regular events, such as marine life presentations and social evenings for divers. There are also many activities around Boracay, or you can simply relax on our white beach and take in the natural beauty of the island and the ocean.

Dive Sites and Fun Diving/Safaris

Q: Can you cater for diving groups and private trips?

A: Absolutely. We often organize private trips for groups with our experienced PADI Professional guides and our purpose-built boats. Your guide will plan the diving around the interests and needs of your group. We advise groups to contact us in advance so that we can prepare for your arrival and make your trip extra special.

Q: Can I dive with you if my license isn’t PADI?

A: Yes, as long as it is a recognized scuba diving organization that provides appropriate training. If in doubt, please send us your certification details.

Q: Can I have a private guide for my dives?

A: Yes. Please make a booking in advance for this service.

Q: Is there any wreck diving around Boracay?

A: Yes, two wrecks are diveable within 5 minutes from Calypso. There is a wonderful wreck called Camia II. This wreck, a 30m long cargo vessel sitting upright in 28 meters of water, was sunk in early 2001 and has since been colonized by many corals, sponges and a huge variety of fish. Additionally, the Boracay Association of Scuba Schools (BASS) placed an aeroplane in February 2012 as an artificial reef! This plane is sitting in 22 – 30 meters on a slope, with a coral wall near the tail and a deep drop-off near the nose. This developing dive site is already exciting and we believe it will blossom into an awesome dive as more marine life starts to make it home.

Q: I am only going to be on Boracay for a short time and just want to do one dive. Can I do the famous Yapak dive?

A: Yapak is an excellent dive and very exciting: it is a deep drift with larger marine life. The wall begins just below 30m with no visual reference for descent or ascent, and it is often subject to strong currents. For this reason we only allow experienced divers with a minimum of an Advanced level license to dive this site. Additionally, we request that divers do one other dive with us prior to diving Yapak. This is to allow you to get used to our boats, staff and procedures, as well as the rental equipment (if you are not using your own equipment). This rule is applicable for everyone, even dive professionals, and is intended as an extra safety measure. That said, as a second dive on Boracay for divers with Advanced or higher, this is a wonderful experience. The topography of the dive site is fabulous and we regularly spot sharks: resting and swimming, babies and large adults! Cool.

Q: I haven’t dived for a while and I’m a bit unsure about getting back in! Can you help me?

A: Yes, that”s what we are here for! If you haven’t dived for a while then you have several options. The PADI Scuba Review program, conducted by a PADI Professional, takes a few hours and will allow you to get comfortable again with safety knowledge and in-water skills by jumping in our training pool to practice. We highly recommend this if you are a bit rusty or nervous. Another option is to enroll in a continuing education course, where you will spend more time with a PADI Instructor, polishing skills you already have and trying out interesting new underwater activities. We usually conduct a pool review as part of these courses as well, so you will get the chance to brush up on your skills before the course as well as gain a new qualification. There are a huge range of courses available and there is sure to be something to fire your diving passion! Alternatively, if you are comfortable with your skills but want something easy to get back into the swing of it, ask one of our staff to recommend a suitable dive site for you to start with and let your guide know how you feel before the dive. Our dives are guided in small groups by experienced PADI Professionals. By talking to your guide before the dive, they can tailor the dive plan to suit the needs of all the divers, bringing along additional staff if needed.

Q: Is a PADI Scuba Review a requirement for diving with you if I haven’t dived for several months?

A: It is highly recommended, but we do not require divers who have been out of the water for several months to always do a PADI Scuba Review. The need for a review session will depend on your comfort level, the time away from diving, and your overall diving experience. It does vary with each person. Please talk to one of our PADI Professionals about your specific needs. If you are unsure, do a Scuba Review: we have a training pool on-site and it only takes a couple of hours in total!

Q: I seem to go through my tank faster than my dive buddies. Any advice?

A: Different divers will always consume their tanks at different rates, and it is nothing to be concerned about. Divers with a larger lung volume and/or body size (e.g. taller) generally consume a little quicker. Also, divers at the early stages of their diving experience generally consume quicker also, but this usually reduces with a few more dives. Remember that everyone started out diving at some point and likely experienced the same issue, so don’t worry! There are a few things that you can do. One is to request a larger tank, if available, from your dive center until you get to the stage where your consumption is reduced. Secondly, you can practice breathing techniques, relaxation and visualization before a dive. Underwater, breathe slowly and deeply, without forcefully sucking the gas out of your tank, and exhale slowly and deeply also. Avoid overexertion, for example do not swim long distances against a current. When swimming, streamline yourself and your equipment, and make your movements efficient: kick and glide rather than continuously kicking. Ensure that you are correctly weighted by doing a weight check, because being over-weighted can make you less streamlined by dragging you down, and thus adversely affect your gas consumption. You can cover these techniques through the Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialty Course. Relax when diving, and don’t think excessively about your air consumption (but of course do regularly monitor your pressure gauge!). Diving more often will allow you to practice these techniques and have more fun underwater.

Q: I seem to go through my tank faster than my dive buddies. Any advice?

A: Different divers will always consume their tanks at different rates, and it is nothing to be concerned about. Divers with a larger lung volume and/or body size (e.g. taller) generally consume a little quicker. Also, divers at the early stages of their diving experience generally consume quicker also, but this usually reduces with a few more dives. Remember that everyone started out diving at some point and likely experienced the same issue, so don’t worry! There are a few things that you can do. One is to request a larger tank, if available, from your dive center until you get to the stage where your consumption is reduced. Secondly, you can practice breathing techniques, relaxation and visualization before a dive. Underwater, breathe slowly and deeply, without forcefully sucking the gas out of your tank, and exhale slowly and deeply also. Avoid overexertion, for example do not swim long distances against a current. When swimming, streamline yourself and your equipment, and make your movements efficient: kick and glide rather than continuously kicking. Ensure that you are correctly weighted by doing a weight check, because being over-weighted can make you less streamlined by dragging you down, and thus adversely affect your gas consumption. You can cover these techniques through the Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialty Course. Relax when diving, and don’t think excessively about your air consumption (but of course do regularly monitor your pressure gauge!). Diving more often will allow you to practice these techniques and have more fun underwater.

Learning to Dive

Q: How long will it take to get my PADI license?

A: PADI courses are performance-based rather than time-based, so the length of time it takes depends on you. However, the PADI Open Water license can usually be achieved in 3 full days. For a more laid-back schedule, we recommend 4 days, but the price is the same. The course includes 5 knowledge sections using multimedia (DVD and your own diving book) and instructor presentations, 5 pool sessions to practice diving skills, and 4 dives in the sea with your instructor to hone skills and have fun. At Calypso we use a modular approach so that you can mix the knowledge with diving portions, and you will be getting in the water on the first day. If you don’t have quite enough time to complete the Open Water course, then you can begin your training and earn the PADI Scuba Diver license. This includes the first 3 knowledge sections, first 3 pool sessions and first 2 dives in the sea. Online learning is also now available for the knowledge sections of your PADI course, so you can complete part of your course before arriving and save up to 1 day of time during your visit. For more details about the courses please visit our page about Learning to Dive.

Q: Is the PADI license recognized around the world?

A: Absolutely! PADI (the Professional Association of Diving Instructors) is the largest recreational diver training organization in the world and its qualifications are recognized internationally.

Q: How deep can I go when I get my first PADI license?

A: For the PADI Open Water Diver license, you can dive to 18 meters independently with a buddy who is also qualified (junior divers 10 and 11 years old can dive to 12 meters; all junior divers must be accompanied by an qualified adult). For the PADI Scuba Diver license, you can dive to 12 meters accompanied by a PADI Professional.

Q: I’d like to learn to dive but I’m not a strong swimmer. Can I do the course?

A: To become a certified diver you will need to have at least some basic watermanship skills, but you do not have to be an Olympic-level swimmer! For the PADI Scuba Diver course you will show your instructor that you can maintain yourself in water too deep to stand up in for 10 minutes, for example by floating, treading water or paddling around. For the PADI Open Water Diver course you will do the above plus a 200 meter swim OR a 300 meter mask-snorkel-fins swim. Individuals who are not confident with these skills can begin with diving through the Discover Scuba Diving program, and later progress to become a certified diver as they grow in confidence and ability in the water and can complete the watermanship skills.

Q: What is the requirement for completing a Medical Questionnaire for PADI courses?

A: All students who wish to engage in a PADI course where there will be in-water activities must complete the RSTC Medical Statement which includes a Divers Medical Questionnaire section. The purpose of this Medical Questionnaire is to find out if you should be examined by your doctor before participating in recreational diver training. If you can answer “NO” to all questions then it is not required to be examined by a doctor. A positive response (“YES”) to any question does not necessarily disqualify you from diving, but it means that there is a preexisting condition that may affect your safety while diving and you MUST seek the advice of your physician prior to engaging in dive activities. You can either see your own physician before arriving for diving, or you can see the physician on Boracay prior to your course. In either case, the physician must FILL IN AND SIGN the relevant section of the medical form before in-water activities. Please remember that this questionnaire is there for your safety and you should answer questions honestly. You can download the RSTC Medical Statement and other participant forms from the PADI website.

Q: I am interested in the PADI Open Water course, but I don’t want to spend my vacation time in the classroom! Any options?

A: Sure. Have a look at PADI eLearning. You can complete all of the knowledge sections of the course online before your vacation, so that you just to do the water portions during your holiday. The eLearning program is very comprehensive and will generate the necessary paperwork for you on completion. Bring that paperwork (and your medical questionnaire) with you and we can start directly with pool and open water dives after a quick review. For eLearners, the water portions of the course take about two and a half days, depending on your learning pace.

Q: I have already done part of my PADI Open Water course and I would like to finish the course at Calypso. Can I do that, and what should I bring with me?

A: We are very happy to accept referred PADI students who can present us with referral paperwork signed by their PADI Instructor. If you have started with PADI eLearning then that paperwork will be the print-out of your knowledge scores. If you have completed the knowledge and/or pool sessions with an instructor then the instructor should have given you a paper referral sheet. Please bring all of your diving materials and paperwork with you to Calypso. If you have a medical form signed by a physician, please bring this with you also. When you arrive, we will begin by evaluating your knowledge and skills in the pool as appropriate to how much of the course you have already completed, working with you on any areas that need a little attention. We will then plan a schedule for you and work through the remaining portions of the course. The time that it takes depends on which modules of the course you have already completed and your pace of learning. As a guide: if you have only the 4 open water dives to complete then allow approximately one and a half days; if you have pool and open water dives to complete then allow two and a half days.

Q: I’d like to become a diver, but I’ve never tried it before and I don’t know whether I will like it. Is there any way to try it first before I join the PADI Open Water course?

A: Yes. We have a program called Discover Scuba Diving just for this purpose. It is a half-day experience where you learn some of the basics in a short classroom session, then get to use the equipment in a pool with your instructor, and then you do a shallow dive in the ocean (with your instructor right beside you) to meet the marine life. This experience does not give you a diving license, but if you like it then the pool session and open water dive can be credited towards your PADI Open Water Diver course.

Q: I already tried diving through the Discover Scuba Diving program. Can that count towards my PADI license?

A: It depends. The Discover Scuba Diving program pool session and open water dive may count towards the PADI Open Water Diver course if you recently completed all of the required skills and these were signed off by an instructor in a formal logbook. At Calypso, our Discover Scuba Diving participants can return with a valid certificate to continue and get credit towards their PADI license. However, our instructors will suggest that skills are still repeated or checked before progressing to ensure mastery before going on to more complex skills. If you were not totally comfortable with the skills the first time or have forgotten how to do the skills, simply enrol in the full Open Water Course from the start. It”s good to refresh and take time to develop your diving abilities. If you are not sure, please discuss your training with one of our Instructors.

Q: I already tried diving through the Discover Scuba Diving program. Can that count towards my PADI license?

A: It depends. The Discover Scuba Diving program pool session and open water dive may count towards the PADI Open Water Diver course if you recently completed all of the required skills and these were signed off by an instructor in a formal logbook. At Calypso, our Discover Scuba Diving participants can return with a valid certificate to continue and get credit towards their PADI license. However, our instructors will suggest that skills are still repeated or checked before progressing to ensure mastery before going on to more complex skills. If you were not totally comfortable with the skills the first time or have forgotten how to do the skills, simply enrol in the full Open Water Course from the start. It”s good to refresh and take time to develop your diving abilities. If you are not sure, please discuss your training with one of our Instructors.

Q: How old do children have to be to learn to dive?

A: Kids can experience scuba diving from as young as 8 years old. Programs for 8 and 9 year olds include PADI Bubblemaker and PADI Seal Team, which are conducted in a confined water environment, such as a swimming pool, with an Instructor. From 10 years old, kids can get out into open water under the close supervision of a PADI Instructor with various junior programs, including Discover Scuba Diving, Junior PADI Scuba Diver, Junior PADI Open Water Diver, and Junior PADI Adventure Diver. From 12 years old, kids can expand on their diving skills through the Junior Advanced Open Water Diver and Junior Rescue Diver programs. From 15 years old, they can earn the regular (non-junior) licenses. All participants under 18 need to have paperwork signed by a parent or guardian before commencing a PADI program. Depth limits and course options do vary with age, so ask a PADI Instructor for more details.

Q: Can I have private tuition for my course?

A: Yes. Please make a booking in advance for this service.

Q: How long will it take for my PADI card to arrive?

A: When you complete your PADI course at Calypso we immediately process your certifications online (the most environmentally friendly and fastest method), so your qualification is in the PADI database for reference right away. We will also immediately provide you with a temporary card that you can use as evidence of your new level of training. This card is valid for 90 days, during which time PADI headquarters will create a permanent card for you. The traditional postal applications take around 6 weeks for processing, but with our online system you get your permanent card delivered to your address on average twice as quickly. If you have not received your permanent card within the 90 days that your temporary card is valid, please contact Calypso so that we can sort it out for you. Since your qualification is in the PADI database you”ll still be able to dive at any PADI center because they can check your certification easily online if you provide your full name and date of birth.

Q: Do you do any courses for non-divers?

A: Yes. We offer several non-diving courses:
• The AWARE Coral Reef Conservation Specialty Course is for people of all ages with an interest in coral reefs. This course describes how coral reefs function and why they are so important. It also reviews why many reefs are in serious trouble and what individuals can do to prevent further decline.
• The Project AWARE Specialty Course is for people of all ages with an interest in aquatic ecosystems. This course covers information about aquatic ecosystem degradation along with conservation measures to protect aquatic resources.
• The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer Level 1 Course can be taken by snorkelers of any age (as well as by divers 10 years old or more). This course helps students develop the knowledge, skills and practical techniques necessary to obtain excellent photographs with a digital camera in the water.
• The Emergency First Response Course is for people of all ages who want to be prepared to help others in need by learning first aid and CPR techniques.

Continuing Your Diving Education

Q: If I have only just finished my PADI Open Water, can I go straight on to the Advanced course?

A: If you are at least 12 years old then absolutely! In fact, you will get a great deal of benefit from doing this because you spend more time with an instructor working on improving your diving repertoire and honing skills. You will also get to try some exciting new activities that will really fire your enthusiasm for diving. For the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course, there is a pool review (if you have not dived with us recently), 2 mandatory dives (navigation and deep) and 3 elective dives where you can choose the kind of diving that most interests you or will be of most benefit to your needs. You and your instructor will therefore select a program tailored specifically to your interests and needs.

Q: I am interested in the PADI Advanced course, but I don”t want to spend my vacation time in the classroom again! Any options?

A: Actually, the PADI Advanced course is quite different to the PADI Open Water program. In your initial training you had to learn from scratch all of the knowledge and skills to become a safe, competent diver, and that did require some time in the classroom and in the pool. Now that you have the necessary skills, the next level of training is more about trying out new activities in open water (while still considering safety of course!). The PADI Advanced Open Water course encompasses 5 dives, 2 of which are mandatory (navigation and deep) and 3 of which are electives where you choose what interests you. For each dive, you will read a short chapter and answer a quick knowledge review (you can do this on the beach or by the pool if you like) and then attend a briefing with your instructor before going for the dive. Do that 5 times and you have your Advanced license! For divers who have not dived with us recently, we will include a quick pool review before the open water dives to ensure you are ready to go. The whole program can be completed in 2 days, or in 3 days if you prefer. All of that time you are out enjoying the island and the diving – perfect! If you really don”t want to be doing any reading or writing at all while on vacation, have a look at PADI eLearning options so that you can complete the knowledge reviews online before you travel.

Q: What are the benefits of doing my PADI Advanced course? For example, can I go deeper?

A: Learning to safely dive into deeper water (up to a maximum of 30 meters), and therefore be able to visit a wider range of dive sites, is indeed part of the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course, but it is not the only thing you will learn. You will also learn techniques for finding your way around dive sites without getting lost or disorientated. Additionally, you get to choose three of your five dives, depending on your personal interests. For example, you might like to explore a wreck, try a night dive, learn how to get great photos underwater, drift dive in a current, fine-tune your buoyancy, or try writing underwater while identifying marine life. It’s exciting stuff! This course will open the door to new dive sites and give you the tools to enhance the enjoyment of your dives.

Q: I have a Junior Open Water Diver license and I want to do more courses. What are my options?

A: Great: more courses mean more fun underwater! Your options depend on how old you are now. If you are 10 or 11 years old then you have the option to do the Junior PADI Adventure Diver license. For this certificate you choose 3 from the following dives: AWARE fish identification, boat dive, digital underwater photography, peak performance buoyancy, underwater naturalist or underwater navigator. You can also expand your training for the dives you enjoy and do the specialty courses. If you are already 12 to 14 years old then you have the option of more dives in addition to the ones listed above: deep dive, drift dive, multilevel dive, night dive, search and recovery and wreck dive. To achieve Junior PADI Adventure Diver select 3 dives, or for Junior PADI Advanced Open Water Diver select deep and navigator plus 3 others. Note that the maximum depth limit for deep dives is 21 meters for the junior license. Some (but not all) of these dives are available as specialties for 12 to 14 year olds. From 12 years old you can also get training for the Junior PADI Rescue Diver license. If you are already 15, you can earn your regular (non-junior) licenses. You also have the option to get certified with Specialties such as Enriched Air (Nitrox), Wreck and Deep. All participants under 18 need to have paperwork signed by a parent or guardian before commencing a PADI program.

Q: I have a Junior PADI license but I am now an adult. What should I do to get a regular license?

A: The best way to get your non-junior PADI license is to do a continuing education course for the next level up. The course that you choose depends on your current level and your interests. Browse our website (especially the courses introduction page) for details of course progression and linking. You can apply to PADI for a replacement card, but there is a PADI administration fee. We strongly recommend continuing education as the most fun, rewarding and easiest route to getting your new card.

Q: I have heard of Nitrox, but how does it work and what are the benefits?

A: Nitrox, also known as Enriched Air, is a breathing gas used for scuba diving. Normal air is composed of around 21% oxygen and 79% nitrogen. The oxygen is used by our body, but the nitrogen is not and so it builds up. It is the nitrogen (as well as the amount of gas left in your tank!) that limits your allowable time underwater (called the no-decompression limit or NDL). With Enriched Air (Nitrox), there is a higher proportion of oxygen in the breathing gas, meaning a lower percentage of nitrogen. This allows for extended NDLs, i.e. longer time underwater (assuming you have gas remaining to breathe!). Nitrox is therefore extremely popular because it means you get more value from each dive. However, a little extra training is required because the higher levels of oxygen mean that depth limits sometimes need to be shallower. Divers using Nitrox need to learn how to analyze their mix, work out their maximum depth and manage their oxygen exposure according to the richness of the mix they are using. With computer use now integrated into the Nitrox course, this procedure is simpler than ever.

Q: I’d like to get Nitrox certified, but I’m worried that I won’t get the benefits because I generally use more air than other divers and have to come up early anyway. Is Nitrox worth it for me?

A: The primary benefit of diving with Enriched Air (Nitrox) is that you take on less nitrogen into your body compared to diving with air. Many divers use Nitrox as a means to be more conservative while diving within air limits, or to benefit them on repetitive dives (e.g. shorter required surface intervals). These benefits are open to you, even if you come up from the dive a little earlier. Additionally, over time and with more experience, divers generally see a marked improvement in their gas consumption rate, so even if you might not be using Nitrox to extend your time underwater with a standard-sized tank just yet, this will likely be something that you will be able to do after a few more dives, and you can always ask for a larger Nitrox tank for the time-being!

Q: Can I do a continuing education course with you if my license isn’t PADI?

A: Most likely. We have a list of the most common organizations whose courses are recognized as suitable pre-requisites for PADI courses. If your agency is not on that list then we will contact PADI Office to ask for advice, which usually takes about one working day. We advise you to send us your full certification details and the name of the PADI continuing education course that you would like to take before arrival so that we can check your qualification against the course pre-requisites.

Q: I’m interested in conservation and learning more about marine life. Are there any courses for this?

A: Yes, we offer a number of specialty courses for people wanting to learn more about marine life and conservation:
• AWARE Coral Reef Conservation
• AWARE Fish Identification
• Underwater Naturalist
Also look out for events, such as marine life presentations and clean-ups.

Q: What is Emergency First Response?

A: People from all ages and backgrounds, whether divers or non-divers, can learn techniques for assisting someone in an emergency through the Emergency First Response (EFR) courses: “Primary Care & Secondary Care” and “Care for Children”. Participants learn through multimedia (DVD and book), observe demonstrations by an EFR Instructor, practice techniques, and then apply these skills in a series of scenarios. These rewarding courses can take as little as just one day depending on the course options you choose.

Q: How long does the PADI Rescue Diver course take?

A: As with other PADI courses, Rescue Diver is performance-based rather than time-based, so the length of time it takes depends on you. As a guide, allow around 4 days to complete the course. The course includes knowledge development (through DVD and manual self-study as well as presentations from your instructor), skill practice sessions and scenarios. Additionally, you will need to have current CPR and first aid (course completed within the last 2 years): if you do not have this pre-requisite then allow one day to complete the Emergency First Response (EFR) Course prior to Rescue Diver.

PADI Professional Diving Courses

Q: What does the PADI Divemaster training at Calypso involve?

A: At Calypso we believe in turning out top-quality well-prepared dive professionals. We have excellent facilities at the Calypso Diving Resort to support your training, including a purpose-built dive pool, air-conditioned classrooms and nitrox. We are situated right on the beach in a fabulous location and have a large diving staff happy to share their professional experience with you. During the PADI Divemaster program, you learn dive leadership skills through both classroom and independent study. You complete water skills and stamina exercises, as well as training exercises that stretch your ability to organize and solve problems (such as a dive site mapping project). You”ll work closely with your mentor, a PADI Instructor, and several other PADI Pros as well, to expand your diving skills and knowledge to the professional level. In the latter part of the course, you will actually be assisting Instructors with student training and guiding qualified divers. The internship-based course is exciting, challenging and very rewarding. Our Divemaster program schedule is tailored to the needs of the candidate. The course can take anything from a couple of weeks to several months, depending on your preparation and how quickly you work through the knowledge and skills portions of the course. Timeframes can be extended or shortened to meet the candidate”s individual learning pace. Please visit the Divemaster Course page for details of pre-requisites, training materials and what you can do with your PADI Divemaster qualification after the course.

Q: Can I work at your dive center during and after my Divemaster training?

A: Whilst you are doing your PADI Divemaster course you will be working as part of an internship within the dive center, under the supervision of your mentor and other PADI pros. This internship is part of the program and is unpaid, but you are getting the valuable experience you will need to work in the diving industry. After your training we may ask you to stay with us if you have the attitude and extra skills that we are looking for. You will need to have developed your local marine life knowledge and usually have additional skills to offer us and our guests in order to find a place for you within the Divemaster team. Those extra skills may include Assistant Instructor or Instructor qualifications: teaching roles on Boracay are a little easier to find than guiding roles, and you may consider the IDC course as your next step at Calypso to open up the door to a rewarding job at our 5 Star Center or elsewhere.

Dive Equipment

Q: Do you have larger sized tanks available at Calypso?

A: Yes, we have 15 liter air and Nitrox tanks on request, in addition to the standard tank size of 12 liters.

Q: Do you have smaller sized tanks available at Calypso?

A: Yes, we have 8 and 10 liter tanks for air on request, in addition to the standard tank size of 12 liters.

Q: Do you have DIN at Calypso?

A: Our tanks are set up for Yoke. However, if you have a DIN regulator we can supply you with an adapter on request.

Q: I want to take some photos underwater. Can I rent a camera?

A: We have digital cameras and housings available for rental to our divers. After your dive we can create a CD of your images for you. If you are new to underwater photography then you might like to consider the PADI Digital Underwater Photography course, which is a 2-dive course with reference book, image processing tutorial, and a CD of your images to take away.

Q: Do you have equipment to fit me?

A: We stock the full range of equipment sizes, including kids’ sizes, in our rental section. If you have any special requests for equipment for your trip then please contact us in advance to discuss your requirements.

Q: How do I go about choosing a dive computer? Which one is best?

A: This is a big topic and is a lot to do with personal choice. When you are looking to buy a dive computer, firstly start by thinking about the basics such as how long does the battery last (they usually need to be sent away for a battery change), the clarity of the display, the size of the digits, the dive alarm settings, the ease of use of the menus, the dive planning capabilities, and the capacity to store (log) dives. It is also strongly recommended to select a computer that can be used with Enriched Air because Nitrox is becoming more common for recreational divers and most divers will want to use it at some stage. Once you have the basics set, consider the more advanced features such as being able to download data to a PC, air-integration, and gas-switching (for technical diving). If you plan to do altitude diving or want to be able to alter the level of conservatism of your computer, then look for suitable adjustment features. Ultimately, the choice of computer depends on what features you like to have, how often and what sort of diving you intend to do (currently and also in the future), and your budget. It is a good idea to visit a dive equipment center so you can see and handle the different computers. One final tip: when you get your new computer ensure that you read the manual to fully understand the settings and display icons so you get the most out of it.

Q: Can I rent a computer while I’m diving with you?

A: Absolutely. We have air/Nitrox-capable dive computers for rent on a daily or weekly basis. They are simple to use and our dive staff will be happy to give you an orientation prior to the dive.

Ask us a question about diving

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Calypso Diving

Calypso Beach & Dive Resort
Station2, White Beach, Boracay

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